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Research Faculty

Rob Turrisi

Rob Turrisi, Ph.D.

Director and Professor

rjt13@psu.edu
Publications

Dr. Rob Turrisi is currently a professor at Penn State University with a joint appointment in the Department of Biobehavioral Health and the Prevention Research Center. Dr. Turrisi received his Ph.D. in social psychology (with an emphasis in decision making and quantitative methods) in 1988 from the University at Albany, State University of New York. His research examines the psychological theories of behavioral decision-making and how these relate to: 1) adolescent and young adult health, 2) family relationships, and 3) efficacious brief interventions to prevent high-risk behaviors.

Selected Publications: Alcohol

Turrisi, R., Mallett, K. A., Cleveland, M., Varvil-Weld, L., Abar, C., Scaglione, N. & Hultgren, B. (2013). An evaluation of timing and dosage of a parent based intervention to minimize college students’ alcohol consumption. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 74, 30-40. PMCID: PMC3517262

Turrisi, R., Mallett, K., Varvil-Weld, L., Guttman, K. (2013). Examining the role of parents in college student alcohol etiology and prevention. In: Interventions for addiction: Comprehensive addictive behaviors and disorders. Elsevier Inc., San Diego: Academic Press, pp. 865–873.

Selected Publications: Skin Cancer

Turrisi, R., Gunn, H., Hultgren B. A., Warner, N. & Mallet, K. A. (2012). The style project: feasibility of collaborating with salons for prevention and early detection of skin cancer. The Archives of Dermatology, 148, 1206-1207. PMCID: PMC3883623

Turrisi, R., Hillhouse, J. Mallett, K., Stapleton, J., & Robinson, J. (2011). A systematic review of intervention efforts to reduce indoor tanning. In C. Heckman, & S. Manne (Eds.). Shedding light on artificial tanning. NY: Springer.


Photo of Kimberly Mallett

Kimberly Mallett, Ph.D.

Research Associate Professor and Clinical Director

kam54@psu.edu
Publications

Dr. Kimberly Mallett is currently a research associate professor at Penn State University in the Prevention Research Center. Dr. Mallett received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Washington. She is interested in developing and evaluating interventions aimed at reducing high risk drinking and related consequences among college students. Her second area of interest is the prevention of skin cancer among high-risk populations. As part of her skin cancer research, Dr. Mallett is interested in enhancing communication between physicians and patients and how it impacts behavior change among patients.

Selected Publications: Alcohol

Mallett, K. A., Marzell, M., Scaglione, N., Hultgren, B., & Turrisi, R. (2014). Are all alcohol and energy drink users the same? Examining individual variation in relation to alcohol mixed with energy drink use, risky drinking and consequences. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 28(1), 97-104. PMCID: PMC4176826

Mallett, K. A., Varvil-Weld, L., Borsari, B., Read, J. P., Neighbors, C., & White, H.R. (2013). An update of research examining college student alcohol-related consequences: New perspectives and implications for interventions. Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 37(5), 709-716. PMCID: PMC3601564.

Selected Publications: Skin Cancer

Mallett, K. A., Turrisi, R., Billingsley, E., Comer, C. D., Read, A., Varvil-Weld, L., Gaber, R., Favero, S., Guttman, K., & Robinson, J. (2012). Enhancing Patients’ Satisfaction and Sun Protective Behaviors Using the ABC Method of Physician-Patient Communication. Archives of Dermatology, 148, 1087-1089. PMCID: PMC4176826

Mallett, K. A., Turrisi, R., Guttman, K., Read, A., Billingsley, E., & Robinson, J. (2011). Assessing dermatologists’ ability to deliver a novel intervention to improve patients’ use of sun protection: The ABC method of physician-patient communication. Archives of Dermatology, 147, 1451-1453. PMCID: PMC3810295


Photo of Michael Cleveland
Michael Cleveland, Ph.D.
Research Assistant Professor
mcleveland@psu.edu Publications
http://www.michaeljcleveland.com/

Michael Cleveland, Ph.D.

Dr. Michael Cleveland is currently a research assistant professor at Penn State in the Prevention Research Center. Dr. Cleveland received his Ph.D. in human development and family studies, with a minor in statistics, from Iowa State University. He is interested in how contextual-level processes interact with family factors, such as parent-teen relationships, to place adolescents at risk for alcohol, tobacco, and other drug (ATOD) abuse. He is also interested in the application of subgroup-based methods toward ATOD research, with particular focus on finite mixture models. A common theme throughout all of Dr. Cleveland's work is the development of prevention and intervention efforts that are tailored to reflect unique characteristics of youth in high-risk communities.

Selected Publications:

Cleveland, M. J., Lanza, S., Ray, A., Turrisi, R., & Mallett, K. (2012). Transitions in first-year college student drinking behaviors: Does pre-college drinking moderate the effects of parent- and peer-based intervention components? Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 26(3), 440-450. PMCID: PMC3413757

Cleveland, M. J., Mallett, K. A., White, H. R., Turrisi, R., & Favero, S. (2013). Patterns of alcohol use and related consequences among non-college-attending emerging adults. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 74, 84-93. PMCID: PMC3517266


Racheal Reavy
Racheal Reavy, Ph.D.
Research Associate & Director of Project Management
rrr25@psu.edu

Racheal Reavy, Ph.D.

Dr. Racheal Reavy is currently a research associate at Penn State in the Prevention Research Center. Dr. Reavy received her Ph.D. in behavioral science from the University of Rhode Island in 2009. She is interested in interventions aimed at reducing risky behavior in adolescents, specifically with regards to high-risk drinking and related consequences.

Selected Publications:

Cleveland, M. J., Reavy, R., Mallett, K. A., Turrisi, R., & White, H. R. (2014). Moderating effects of positive parenting and maternal alcohol use on emerging adults' alcohol use: Does living at home matter? Addictive Behaviors, 39(5), 869-878. PMCID: PMC3982921

Mallett, K. A., Scaglione, N., Reavy, R., & Turrisi, R. (2015). Longitudinal patterns of alcohol mixed with energy drink use among college students and their associations with risky drinking and problems. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 76(3), 389-396. PMCID: PMC4440297


Photo of Holly Gunn, M.D., M.P.H.
Holly Gunn, M.D., M.P.H.
Research Associate
hgunn@lancasterskincenter.com

Holly Gunn, M.D., M.P.H.

Dr. Holly Gunn is currently a practicing dermatologist in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Dr. Gunn graduated in biochemistry at the University of Maryland in 2003. She then attended medical school in her hometown at the University of South Alabama College of Medicine and was elected to the Alpha Omega Honors Society as a medical student. She moved to Pennsylvania with her husband and completed an internal medicine internship and dermatology residency at Penn State Hershey Medical Center. She began collaborating with the Prevention Research Center in 2008 on multiple skin cancer prevention projects, which remains her passion. She also received a master's degree in public health while in residency for her work in skin cancer prevention.

Selected Publications:

Turrisi, R., Gunn, H., Hultgren, B. A., Warner, N., & Mallet, K. A. (2012). The style project: feasibility of collaborating with salons for prevention and early detection of skin cancer. The Archives of Dermatology, 148, 1206-1207. PMCID: PMC3883623

Abar, B. W., Turrisi, R., Hillhouse, J., Loken, E., Stapleton, J., & Gunn, H.(2010). Preventing skin cancer in college females: Heterogeneous effects over time. Health Psychology, 29, 574-582.


Photo of John Hustad, Ph.D.
John Hustad, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
jhustad@hmc.psu.edu

John Hustad, Ph.D.

Dr. John Hustad is currently an assistant professor at the Penn State College of Medicine. He received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Syracuse University. In addition, he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies at Brown University. His research program strives to develop and evaluate efficient alcohol prevention strategies for young adults. He is particularly interested in understanding the mechanisms of change in these brief interventions. This programmatic line of research has potential to improve existing approaches to reduce heavy drinking.

Selected Publications:

Hustad, J. T. P., Pearson, M. R., Neighbors, C., & Borsari, B. (2014). The role of alcohol perceptions as mediators between personality and alcohol-related outcomes among incoming college student drinkers. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 28(2), 336-347. PMCID: PMC4131255

Hustad, J. T. P., Mastroleo, N. R., Kong, L., Urwin, R., Zeman, S., LaSalle, L., & Borsari, B. (2014). The comparative effectiveness of individual and group brief motivational interventions for mandated college students. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 28(1), 74-84. PMCID: PMC4062841


Graduate Research Assistants


Bradley Trager
Bradley Trager, M.S., M.A.
Graduate Student
bpt5091@psu.edu

Bradley Trager, M.S., M.A.

Bradley Trager received his B.S. in psychology in 2009 and his M.S. in applied psychology in 2010 from Lynn University in Boca Raton, Florida, and his M.A. in experimental psychology in 2013 from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, Florida. After completing his M.S., Bradley spent two years working as an instructor in the psychology department at Lynn University. Currently, Bradley is a graduate student in the biobehavioral health program at Penn State. He is interested in examining the dynamic interplay between individual differences and situations that lead people (throughout the lifespan) to engage in or avoid health-promoting behaviors. He is also interested in communicating his research into the area of prevention; specifically, tailoring programs to target populations who are most at risk for experiencing negative consequences associated with behaviors such as alcohol and substance use.


Photo of Brittney Hultgren, M.S.
Brittney Hultgren, M.S.
Graduate Student
bah306@psu.edu
Publications

Brittney Hultgren, M.S.

Brittney Hultgren received her B.A. in psychology in 2008 from Emmanuel College in Boston, Massachusetts and her M.S. in biobehavioral health in 2013 from Penn State. She is currently a graduate student in the Biobehavioral Health program at Penn State. She is interested in studying alcohol use coupled with other substance use, including stimulants, energy drinks, and opiates, in college students. She is interested in looking at the total spectrum of these issues involving decision-making, prevention, and intervention.

Selected Publications:

Hultgren, B. A., Cleveland, M. J., Turrisi, R., & Mallett, K. A. (2014). How estimation of drinking influences alcohol-related consequences across the first year of college. Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research, 38(4), 1160-1166. PMCID: PMC3984364

Turrisi, R., Gunn, H., Hultgren, B. A., Warner, N., & Mallet, K. A. (2012). The style project: feasibility of collaborating with salons for prevention and early detection of skin cancer. The Archives of Dermatology, 148, 1206-1207. PMCID: PMC3883623


Photo of Nichole Sell, M.Ed.
Nichole Sell, M.Ed.
Graduate Student
nms5213@psu.edu
Publications

Nichole Sell, M.Ed.

Nichole Sell received her B.A. in psychology in 2006 from Cedar Crest College in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and her M.Ed. in counseling and human services in 2008 from Lehigh University in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania. After completing her master’s degree, Nichole spent five years working as an adjunct psychology instructor at Northampton Community College in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, and Lehigh Carbon Community College in Schnecksville, Pennsylvania. She is currently a doctoral student in the biobehavioral health program at Penn State. She is interested in understanding why adolescents and emerging adults engage in health-compromising behaviors such as high-risk alcohol use and tanning, and how these behaviors can be prevented or reduced. She would also like to examine how parents, peers, and dating partners influence an adolescent’s decision to partake in risky behaviors, and whether gender differences exist with respect to these health decisions

Selected Publications:

Sell, N. M., Turrisi, R., Scaglione, N. M., Hultgren, B. A., & Mallett, K. A. (2016). Examining the effects of drinking and interpersonal protective behaviors on unwanted sexual experiences in college women. Addictive Behaviors, 54, 40-45. PMCID: PMC4713305

Mallett, K. A., Turrisi, R., Cleveland, M. J., Scaglione, N. M., Reavy, R., Sell, N. M., & Varvil-Weld, L. (2015). A dual process examination of alcohol-related consequences among first-year college students. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 76(6), 862-871. PMCID: PMC4712656


Research Support


Photo of Sarah Ackerman, M.S.
Sarah Ackerman, M.S.
Senior Project Manager & Research Assistant
sdf5013@psu.edu
Publications

Sarah Ackerman, M.S.

Sarah Ackerman received her B.A. in sociology in 2009 and her M.S. in human resources and employment relations in 2011, both from Penn State. She has experience in researching risk activities including alcohol use and sexual behaviors in college students. She is interested in gaining additional experience in alcohol abuse prevention, specifically among college students, and increasing her knowledge on skin cancer prevention programs.

Selected Publications:

Mallett, K. A., Ackerman, S., Turrisi, R., & Robinson, J. (2015). Rates of sunburn among dermatology patients. JAMA Dermatology, 151(2), 231-232.

Cleveland, M. J., Mallett, K. A., White, H. R., Turrisi, R., & Favero, S. (2013). Patterns of alcohol use and related consequences among non-college-attending emerging adults. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 74, 84-93. PMCID: PMC3517266


Photo of Diana Poorman
Diana Poorman
Research Technologist
dlp20@psu.edu

Diana Poorman

Diana Poorman started her career at Penn State in 2004 in the College of Health and Human Development Research Office. This experience provided background knowledge for managing grants and subcontracts. In our lab Diana is responsible for completing reports, paying invoices, doing projections for future year spending, providing support for subject payments, ERS reporting, and organizing travel for our research team. She is excited to be part of such a wonderful research group.